‘Monday’s Not Coming’ spoiler-free review!

Hi everyone! Today I’m reviewing Monday’s Not Coming, the second novel from Tiffany D. Jackson. (I’m ridiculously late with my review of this one but I’m finally getting round to it.) Huge thanks to Harper360 for sending me an ARC!

 

What the book is about…

Monday Charles is missing, and only Claudia seems to notice. Claudia and Monday have always been inseparable—more sisters than friends. So when Monday doesn’t turn up for the first day of school, Claudia’s worried. When she doesn’t show for the second day, or second week, Claudia knows that something is wrong. Monday wouldn’t just leave her to endure tests and bullies alone. Not after last year’s rumors and not with her grades on the line. Now Claudia needs her best—and only—friend more than ever. But Monday’s mother refuses to give Claudia a straight answer, and Monday’s sister April is even less help.

As Claudia digs deeper into her friend’s disappearance, she discovers that no one seems to remember the last time they saw Monday. How can a teenage girl just vanish without anyone noticing that she’s gone?

 

What I thought of it…

Unfortunately, this one left me feeling a bit ‘meh’. I acknowledge that the author tackled an important topic that is not being given the attention it deserves in the media; sadly, I just didn’t particularly enjoy the execution of it.

The narrative voice felt VERY young, to the point that I felt like I was reading the thoughts of a ten-year-old at many points. (And don’t misunderstand me here, because I enjoy reading young narrators when it’s middle grade and they are supposed to sound like ten-year-olds.) The immaturity may have been a conscious choice on the part of the author (for reasons I can’t discuss because they would be gigantic spoilers) but the tone just felt really incongruous to the character’s age. The whole ‘secret language’ thing felt very childish.

The book also featured the most confusing timeline ever (and I didn’t really feel any less confused when it supposedly resolved itself. I still don’t know when certain scenes took place.) It made it difficult for me to become invested in the story; I didn’t feel gripped because I was constantly being pulled out of the action into random ‘filler’ scenes in the past (or what I believe was the past anyway). I wasn’t very shocked by the ‘twist’, though I did find some of the details quite harrowing.

It wasn’t all bad. I liked the use of colour throughout the book – it was an interesting technique that I haven’t seen done very often. I also loved Claudia’s dad as a character – he was parent goals! He was so supportive and helpful, and a great father, which is something we rarely get to see in YA literature.

Overall, I respect what the author tried to do here in raising awareness of an issue she believes is not acknowledged enough (as explained in her author’s note). I just didn’t particularly enjoy the execution of it. This was a fast read but I feel like, ultimately, it will be forgettable.

 

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Has anyone read this one? Or Tiffany Jackson’s first novel? What are your thoughts on books that tackle difficult current topics? 

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3 thoughts on “‘Monday’s Not Coming’ spoiler-free review!

  1. I haven’t read this one, and it does sound like it tackles important issues, but since confusing timelines don’t do it for me, I won’t be picking this one up. Great review of the book, though!

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  2. Pingback: July Wrap-Up! (In which normal functioning resumes) | the paperback piano

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